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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
-american poet richard blanco recited a poem called "1 today." he is the first latino as well as the first openly gay poet to read at an inaugural ceremony. >> my face, your face, millions of faces in morning's mirrors, each one yawning to life, crescendoing into our day. the pencil yellow school buses, the rhythm of traffic lights. africa stands: apples, limes, and oranges arrayed like rainbows begging our praise. silver trucks heavy with oil or paper, bricks or milk, teeming over highways alongside us, on our way to clean tables, read ledgers, or save lives. to teach geometry or ring of groceries as my mother did for 20 years, so i could write this poem. >> cuban-american poet richard blanco reciting the palm "1 today" a president of his inauguration on monday. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. when we come back, we are here in park city, utah, the sundance film festival. one of the films that has just premiered is called, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield." we will speak with the subject of that film and its producer, investigative jou
: and inaugural poet richard blanco discusses what it means to be a part of such a momentous occasion. >> brown: we have more on the fallout after lance armstrong's admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs to build his chpionship career. >> suarez: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: information trickled out today about the siege of a natural gas plant in algeria. there was word that one american hostage had been killed, but a definitive accounting of all the captives remained
will be just the fifth inaugural poet in the nation's history. richard blanco was, as he says, "made in cuba"-- he was conceived there; "assembled in spain"-- his mother gave birth to him there; and quickly "imported to the united states"-- he grew up in miami. he trained and worked as a civil engineer before turning to poetry. he's published three volumes, most recently one titled "looking for the gulf motel". blanco now lives in the small town of bethel, maine. on monday, he will become the first latino, the first openly gay, and the youngest poet to read his work at a presidential inauguration. welcome. >> thank you. >> congratulations. >> pleasure to be here. >> let me get to some of these firsts first, this inauguration say political event and it is a rare meeting of in your case politics and poetry. what do you see yourself bringing to it? ness well, i think first and foremost hopefully a great-- it is a question that had been ploting airport in the air. i would think and i would hope that i would hecht select first and foremost obviously for respect and admiration for my work. but it
is richard blanco. he's a poet who was trained as a civil engineer because his parents insisted that writing would never take him anywhere, but he will be delivering his poetry today at the president's inauguration. and then the benediction will be delivered by luis leon, who is the rector of st. john's church, the little church right across the street from the white house. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the chairman for the inaugurational ceremonies, the honorable charles e. schumer. >> mr. president, mr. vice president, members of congress, all who are present and to all who are watching, welcome to the capitol and to this celebration of our great democracy. now, this is the 57th inauguration of an american president, and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, its simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, its meaning, that sacred and yet cautious entrusting of power from we, the people, to our chosen leader never fails to make one's heart beat faster, as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! now, we know that we would not be here today we
by justice sotomayor. at noon, the inaugural address and the inaugural poem by richard blanco. at 12:30, the benediction. as we speak, president obama is about to step outside onto the west front of the capital. we are joined by clarence lusane, author of "the black history of the white house." professor at american university here in washington, d.c., professor of international relations. this book goes beyond the white house. it also talks about the capital, talks about those who built these institutions, physically. many of them enslaved. >> this is an important history. in fact, the capitol has now demolished the slave labor that went into building that building. there are two plaques, one in the main hallway, one on the house side. there is nothing in the white house that a knowledge as that. if you go on a tour, now self- guided, you can go through the blue room, the other important rooms in the white house, but there is nothing that tells you where the slave quarters were, where people lived in the basement, for example, during the period of slavery. so there is the need for t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)